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USCIS Closure Update: Office closures have been extended until June 3rd, Re-opening on June 4, 2020

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will remain closed for in-person services at its field offices, asylum offices, and application support centers (ASCs) to help slow the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). Employees in these offices are continuing to perform mission-essential services that do not require face-to-face contact with the public while the offices are temporarily closed. USCIS offices will re-open in compliance with local and state orders, on or after June 4, 2020. If you have an appointment, asylum interview, or naturalization ceremony impacted by the extended temporary closure, USCIS will automatically reschedule a new date and will send a notice with the new time,

USCIS Closure Update: Office closures have been extended until June 3rd, Re-opening on June 4, 2020

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will remain closed for in-person services at its field offices, asylum offices, and application support centers (ASCs) to help slow the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). Employees in these offices are continuing to perform mission-essential services that do not require face-to-face contact with the public while the offices are temporarily closed. USCIS offices will re-open in compliance with local and state orders, on or after June 4, 2020. If you have an appointment, asylum interview, or naturalization ceremony impacted by the extended temporary closure, USCIS will automatically reschedule a new date and will send a notice with the new time,

What Does It Mean: Making Sense of the president's "Proclamation Suspending Entry of Immigr

On April 22, 2020, President of the United States, Donald Trump, signed an order to suspend immigration into the United States temporarily. The White House published the full Proclamation after work on the logistics and legal implications of the president’s order to freeze the U.S. immigration system in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Alleging that the days between the national emergency declaration and April 11, 2020, more than 22 million Americans have filed for unemployment, President Trump proclaimed the immigrant entry should be subject to certain restrictions, limitations, and exceptions. The order is in effect for 60 days and he cites Sections 212(f) as the main authority. To da

What Does It Mean: Making Sense of the president's "Proclamation Suspending Entry of Immigrants"

On April 22, 2020, President of the United States, Donald Trump, signed an order to suspend immigration into the United States temporarily. The White House published the full Proclamation after work on the logistics and legal implications of the president’s order to freeze the U.S. immigration system in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Alleging that the days between the national emergency declaration and April 11, 2020, more than 22 million Americans have filed for unemployment, President Trump proclaimed the immigrant entry should be subject to certain restrictions, limitations, and exceptions. The order is in effect for 60 days and he cites Sections 212(f) as the main authority. To da

USCIS Updates: COVID-19 Delays in Extension of Status & Change of Status Filings

On April 13, 2020, USCIS released a note recognizing that there are immigration-related challenges as a direct result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and some delays in extension/change of status. Generally, nonimmigrants must depart the United States before their authorized period of admission expires. However, USCIS recognizes that nonimmigrants may unexpectedly remain in the United States beyond their authorized period of stay due to COVID-19. Should this occur, you must apply for extension of stay (EOS) or change in status (COS). U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services continues to accept and process applications and petitions even with the USCIS being closed to the public. If y

USCIS Update: COVID-19 Delays in Extension of Status & Change of Status Filings

On April 13, 2020, USCIS released a note recognizing that there are immigration-related challenges as a direct result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and some delays in extension/change of status. Generally, nonimmigrants must depart the United States before their authorized period of admission expires. However, USCIS recognizes that nonimmigrants may unexpectedly remain in the United States beyond their authorized period of stay due to COVID-19. Should this occur, you must apply for extension of stay (EOS) or change in status (COS). U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services continues to accept and process applications and petitions even with the USCIS being closed to the public. If y

Changes in Work Conditions during COVID-19

In response to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, many local and state governmental authorities are instituting social distancing. This, in combination with the U.S. and global economies especially in the stock market has prompted some employers to evaluate and assess their business operations. Here are some tips if your employer decides to suspend, furlough, layoff, reduce hours, or otherwise render an employee unproductive during the crisis. H-1B1 and E-3 nonimmigrant visas can be under non- productive status during the COVID-19. Non-productive status is defined as any time during the validity of the Labor Condition Application (LCA) and H-1B petition where an employee is unable to work. When

Non-Immigrant Visa Holders & Changes in Work Conditions During Covid-19

In response to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, many local and state governmental authorities are instituting social distancing. This, in combination with the U.S. and global economies especially in the stock market has prompted some employers to evaluate and assess their business operations. Here are some tips if your employer decides to suspend, furlough, layoff, reduce hours, or otherwise render an employee unproductive during the crisis. H-1B1 and E-3 nonimmigrant visas can be under non- productive status during the COVID-19. Non-productive status is defined as any time during the validity of the Labor Condition Application (LCA) and H-1B petition where an employee is unable to work. When

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